2018 Exhibitions

Fourth Annual Group Show

Juror: Paula Tognarelli
Executive Director & Curator: Griffin Museum of Photography

Reception for Artists
Saturday, July 14, 5-7 pm

Exhibition Dates: July 14 – August 12, 2018  
SHOW CATALOG

4th Annual Group Show, Davis Orton Gallery

4th Annual Group Show, Davis Orton Gallery

•Amy Anderson   •Susan Anthony   •Michael Bogdanffy-Kriegh
Linda Cassidy   •Frank Curran   •Sandi Daniel
Harvey Davidowitz  •Nina Weinberg Doran   •Ken Dreyfack
Melissa Eder  •Benjamin Ernest  •Diane Fenster
•Dennis Geller  •Nadide Goksun  •Paul Greenberg
•John Harris  •Susan Higgins  •Rohina Hoffman
•Leslie Jean-Bart  •Marcy Juran  •Karen Klinedinst
•Pierre-Yves Linot  •Joyce P Lopez  •Jennifer Lothrigel
•James Mahoney  •Alina Marin-Bliach  •John Matturri
•Mahala Mazerov  •Miao Miao  •John Patrick  Naughton
•Diana Nicholette Jeon  •Neil Nourse  •Jane Paradise
•Louise Pedno  •Michael Prais  •Russ Rowland
•Joshua Sarinana  •Andi Schreiber  •Amy Shapiro
•Leslie Sheryll  •Rebecca Skinner  •Larry Snider
•Jean Sousa  •Michael Stepansky  •JP Terlizzi
•Marie Triller   •Allison Welch   •Stephen Wicks
•Caren Winnal   •Carol Wontkowsky   •Yelena Zhavoronkova

4th Annual Group Show in galleries of Davis Orton Gallery

4th Annual Group Show in galleries of Davis Orton Gallery


 Landscapes: Abstract, Fractured, Suggested

Margaret Saliske

David Drake

 Portfolio Showcase 
Barrack Evans and William Nourse

Exhibition Dates:
June 16 to July 8, 2018

Reception for Artists: Saturday, June 16, 5-7 pm  


Margaret Saliske – mixed media

for all Margaret’s works in exhibition, see FlatFile- Margaret Saliske


“Site 1″, 14″ x 19”, inkjet, masonite, plexiglas by Margaret Saliske 

"Fioli," 2016, 14"h x 13"w, 3"d, inkjet, aluminum by Margaret Saliske

“Fioli,” 2016, 14″h x 13″w, 3″d, inkjet, aluminum by Margaret Saliske

David Drake – mixed media, painting

for all David’s works in exhibition, see FlatFile – David Drake

"To Advocate" 11"x17", graphite and acrylic on bristol by David Drake

“To Advocate” 11″x17″, graphite and acrylic on bristol by David Drake

by David Drake

Edges Evening, 19″ x 24″, acrylic and pastel on bristol by David Drake


Portfolio Showcase

Selected through our Portfolio Showcase International Call for Entries, 
the gallery will also feature two portfolios  

Barrack Evans, Iceland, the road to Höfn

for all Barrack’s photographs in exhibition, see FlatFile – Barrack Evans

Blue Wall by Barrack Evans

Blue Wall by Barrack Evans

William Nourse, Detachment

for all William’s photographs in exhibition, see FlatFile – William Nourse

Terra Incognita XVIII by William Nourse

Terra Incognita XVIII by William Nourse 


About the Artists

Margaret Saliske, Recent Work

Yellow and Blue by Margaret Saliske, inkjet and aluminum

Yellow and Blue, 11″w x 4.5″d x 17″h  by Margaret Saliske, inkjet and aluminum

Artist Margaret Saliske of Hudson NY is interested in manipulating how we see the natural world and man made objects that reside in it. How structure can alter depth of field and create a new setting for what is familiar.

Saliske uses photographic images of landscapes, architecture and industrial sites . The landscapes, though flat photographic images, become 3 dimensional again by cutting, folding, creating new planes and spaces that juxtapose the natural imagery.

Most recently she has become interested in how architecture and industrial structures are situated in the landscape. She has been photographing sites and then removing, reiterating and reimagining elements in a new format . They are abstracted yet still relate to the initial image generating a new space devoid of landscape.

Bio:  Margaret Saliske lived and worked in New York City until moving to the Hudson River Valley in 1989. Recent group exhibitions include Samuel Dorsky Museum of Art, New Paltz NY; Opalka Gallery, Albany NY, Graficas Gallery, Nantucket MA; Carrie Haddad Photographs and Carrie Haddad Gallery, Hudson NY. Saliske has been represented by Stafford Contemporary and Graficas Gallery. She has a B.A. degree from Bennington College and attended the Whitney Museum of American Art Independent Study Program in Studio Art.

David Drake, Recent Work

Sluggish, 19″ x 24″, graphite pencil on bristol by David Drake

Sluggish, 19″ x 24″, graphite pencil on bristol by David Drake

Having studied printmaking, David Drake is more attracted to the drawing process as a way in to both his drawings and paintings. For him, drawing is a way of interpreting the world; the importance of “feeling” what you are drawing as it comes to life is paramount. Moving back and forth between drawing and painting, Drake will stay with a single object or idea, expanding or contracting the world around it through a series of works.

Drake’s recent work started out as an exercise in improvisation that evolved into “something like “landscape.” Drake prefers not to plan but rather, be open and receptive—to improvise, to start something before he knows what it’s going to be.

Drake likes to leave clues to his thought processes—like when he decides to move a line that he has drawn in pencil, creating a sense of motion because you can still see the pale shadow of the old line. “You can erase a line, but it leaves a ghost.” He likes the chaotic feeling that comes from all the apparent indecision and ambiguity as he works, but he also likes the resolution that comes as its final state evolves out of what were just squiggles and patience.
Thanks to Stephen Leon for sharing info with the gallery. For an extended interview with Drake, see Stephen Leon Blog

Bio: David Drake of Catskill NY, and longtime resident of Hudson NY, received his BFA in printmaking with a minor in photography from the Cleveland Institute of Art where he studied with Carroll Cassil, Ralph Woehrmann and Robert Jergens. After graduating, he taught photography in Cleveland Public Schools and began a life long practice of painting and drawing. While earning his degree in printmaking, Drake waited tables and bartended, skills that carried him through the financial ups and downs of life as an artist. (Currently he bartends at the restaurant Rive Gauche Bistro in Athens).

Previous solo exhibitions include Davis Orton Gallery, Hudson NY and Cabane Gallery, Phoenicia NY. Among the galleries he has exhibited are the Maryland Federation of Art, Annapolis MD; Neville Sargeant Gallery, Chicago IL; Southern Vermont Art Center, Manchester VT. His work is represented in private and corporate collections throughout the country.

Portfolio Showcase

Barrack Evans, Iceland, the road to Höfn

Iceberg by Barrack Evans

Iceberg by Barrack Evans

In 2012, Barrack Evans saw the James Balog documentary, Chasing Ice, about photographing receding glaciers all over the world. He knew he needed to see these massive rivers of ice before their wonder melted into the oceans.  Five years later, he travelled to Iceland to drive 500 km along it’s southeast coast past Vatnajökull Glacier, Europe’s largest glacier, to Vestrahorn Mountain near Höfn and photograph some of the same glaciers that so dramatically demonstrate the effects of global warming on our planet. 

He drove the ring road, living out of a camper with no schedule to keep except a midweek reservation for a zodiac boat tour on the Jökulsárlón lagoon. The landscapes are not only glaciers but also lagoons and icebergs left behind as a result of glacial retreat. Vatnajökull National Park is surrounded by the black sand beaches of Diamond Beach and getting there takes you along moss covered lava fields, past ancient sea cliffs, waterfalls, rivers and canyons formed by progressive erosion. Vatnajökull has deglaciated by about 10% since the end of the 19th century, 3% lost in just the last 10 years. Any return to Iceland would be to a new and altered landscape of diminished glaciers.

Bio: After over 30 years of managing Non-Profit and Off-Broadway theatre companies, Barrack Evans has returned to his home state, Vermont, where he is a fine art photographer based in Dorset and the proud new owner/operator of Battenkill Bicycles in Manchester, VT. Balancing life as an artist and bicycle shop owner/cyclist, he photographs a range of subjects in Vermont and travels when he can to locations from Yosemite National Park to Vatnajökull National Park in Iceland. His photographs have been exhibited in solo and group shows at the Southern Vermont Art Center, Manchester, Vermont.

Barrack Evans is a graduate of Ithaca College with a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Theatre Production Arts. He has studied photography at the International Center for Photography in New York City and the Griffin Museum of Photography in Winchester, MA.

William Nourse, Detachment

Terra Incognita XXXIII by William Nourse

Terra Incognita XXXIII by William Nourse 

While landscape photography often concentrates on showing beauty or drama with context such as a grand landscape in the mountains, William Nourse is deliberately focused on taking that context away from the viewer. Shot in the Gobi Desert in November 2017, there is no sense of scale, and orientation of the images feels arbitrary, rather than conforming to traditional landscape standards. By detaching the images from their context, he forces the viewer to ask the question ‘what am I looking at?’ and come to her own conclusions.

Bio: Will Nourse is a landscape photographer known for his use of color and texture to bring his outdoor experiences to life.

His work reflects a lifetime of hiking, backpacking, climbing, skiing and sailing, all of which have given him a deep appreciation for the wonders of the natural world.  He was a featured artist in the exhibition ‘Expeditions: From Iceland to the Gobi’ at the Paula Estey Gallery, Newburyport, MA. In 2017 he was selected for the Cambridge Art Association’s National Prize Show (2017), and his image ‘Seljalandsfoss #2’ was selected as Best in Show for Photography in the NAA’s 20th Annual Regional Juried Show (2017). Nourse resides in Amesbury, MA.

 


 In the Garden: Public, Private, Spiritual

Vaughn Sills

Sarah Sterling

 Portfolio Showcase 
Laurie Blakeslee and Lisa Redburn

Exhibition Dates:
May 12 to June 10, 2018

Reception for Artists: Saturday, May 12, 5-7 pm  


Vaughn Sills, Places for the Spirit:
Traditional African American Gardens in the South

for all images in Vaughn Sill’s show: Vaughn Sills FlatFile

Annie Belle Sturgehill's Garden, Athens, Georgia, 1988 by Vaughn Sills

Annie Belle Sturgehill’s Garden, Athens, Georgia, 1988 by Vaughn Sills

 

Annie Belle Sturghill, Athens, Georgia, 1988 by Vaughn Sills

Annie Belle Sturghill, Athens, Georgia, 1988 by Vaughn Sills

Pearl Fryer's Garden Bishopville, North Carolina, 2002 by Vaughn Sills

Pearl Fryer’s Garden Bishopville, North Carolina, 2002 by Vaughn Sills

Sarah Sterling, Cultivated Chaos

For all images in Sarah Sterling’s show, Sarah Sterling FlatFile 

Swallowtail and Lily by Sarah Sterling

Swallowtail and Lily by Sarah Sterling

 

Humingbird and Flowers by Sarah Sterling

Humingbird and Flowers by Sarah Sterling

Junco in Snow by Sarah Sterling

Junco in Snow by Sarah Sterling

Portfolio Showcase

Laurie Blakeslee, 40 Year Garden

For all images in Laurie Blakeslee’s portfolio: Laurie Blakeslee Flatfile

Planting Leeks by Laurie Blakeslee

Planting Leeks by Laurie Blakeslee

Lisa Redburn, Water Tapestries

For all the images in Lisa Redburn’s Portfolio: Lisa Redburn Flatfile

Early Summer, Triptych by Lisa Redburn

Early Summer, Triptych by Lisa Redburn

About the Artists

Vaughn Sills, Places for the Spirit:
Traditional African American Gardens in the South

Bea Robinson, Athens, Georgia by Vaughn Sills

Bea Robinson, Athens, Georgia by Vaughn Sills

One early September afternoon in 1988,  Vaughn Sills found herself on the porch of Bea Robinson’s house in Athens, Georgia. While her friend and Bea chatted about their lives, she looked around and became entranced by Bea’s garden. “Something came over me – or through me – as I stood in the garden, looking, feeling, sensing the energy or magic or spirit, call it what you will, that surrounded me.” On that warm, soft, sunny day, Sills took the first of what became a series of photographs, from throughout the South, that she worked on for nearly twenty years.

Sills’ series, Places of the Spirit, documents a tradition that is a way of using the land that is both historically significant and aesthetically resonant. Scholars have studied African American gardens and traced many of their traits to Africa, pointing out similar uses of the land and finding that slaves brought with them not only plant seeds, but agricultural expertise, some of it still in evidence today.

These gardens speak a certain language – a language, Sills is convinced, that is about the earth, about beauty, and about spirit.” Some of the vocabulary of this language is about belief and spiritual knowledge – the empty bottles, the pipes sticking upright out of the ground, dolls – and have specific meanings that relate to the spirits of ancestors or magical powers and that go back centuries and across an ocean; some of the vocabulary is functional, practical, born of necessity – the vegetable gardens, the chicken coops; and some is quite simply of beauty – the impatiens and petunias and pinks, the rose bushes, prickly pears, and canna lilies. The way the vocabulary is put together is based on tradition, custom, function, and each gardener’s sense of what looks pleasing – in a special and recognizable style. This style becomes the structure of the language; this structure is aesthetic; and this aesthetic is beauty. 

The Book: Places for the Spirit

Places for the Spirit
Trinity University Press
San Antonio TX

“Looking at these black and white images sometimes feels like dropping paper flowers in a glass of water and watching them expand. Vaughn Sills’s images make the mind expand like a rose, fragrant with vision…. [Her] humility in the face of the order she finds in these various gardens is touching – and enlightening.”      –Hilton Als

“Sills, who took these photographs in Georgia, the two Carolinas, Louisiana, [Mississippi], and Alabama, includes the location in each title. How could she not, these images are so idiosyncratically — so wondrously — specific. That said, they also convey a sense of being beyond place — and outside of time. Humanity, the Bible says, started in a garden. Looking at these photographs, one can see how it continues in gardens, too.”        
–Mark Feeney, The Boston Globe 

Two photographs from this body of work are in the gorgeous new book, 
The Photographer in the Garden, 
published jointly by Aperture and the George Eastman House

Bio: Vaughn Sills’ work has been has been exhibited widely, in museums and galleries; the galleries of botanic gardens; and are in the collections of the DeCordova Museum, Harvard Art Museum, the Eaton Vance Collection, among others. Sills has received several significant awards — twice she received the Artist’s Fellowship in Photography by the Massachusetts Cultural Council; other grants and awards have come from the Artadia Dialogue for Art and Culture, the Polaroid Foundation, and The New England Foundation for the Arts.

Her photographs and books, Places for the Spirit, Traditional African American Gardens (2010) and One Family (2001) earned awards from the Garden Writers Association and the Magazine Association for the Southeast.

Vaughn is a Visiting Scholar at Brandeis University’s Women’s Studies Research Center and Associate Professor Emerita of Photography at Simmons College. She lives and works in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and Prince Edward Island, Canada.

Sarah Sterling, Cultivated Chaos

Goldfinch and Redbud by Sarah Sterling

Goldfinch and Redbud by Sarah Sterling

In Cultivated Chaos, Sarah Sterling documents the ongoing evolution of her Hudson NY garden—its metamorphoses through the seasons, along with its avian and insect visitors. As she seeks out the often unseen mysteries of the garden—ephemeral moments of exuberance and reflection, she creates unusual compositions and color combinations that suit her painterly vision. Sterling has learned over the years that her photographs, no matter how carefully planned, must yield to the plants which have their own agenda, creating the cheerful chaos that becomes the foreground, or background, of each composition. 

Bio: Sarah Sterling of Hudson NY is an award winning photographer who has exhibited her work widely in the Hudson Valley region. Venues include Spencertown Academy galleries, John Davis Gallery, Hudson Area Library, Earle Mitchell Gallery, Davis Orton Gallery, Hudson Opera House, Berkshire Museum and Columbia Green Community College. Among her projects are “The Meadow”, an ongoing photo essay, Flower/Garden Abstract Series, and, individually, Birds, Dragonflies, and Insects.  

Selected through our Portfolio Showcase International Call for Entries
the gallery is also featuring portfolios by
Laurie Blakeslee & Lisa Redburn

Laurie Blakeskee, 40 Year Garden

The garden is growth and change and that means loss as well as constant new treasures to make up for a few disasters.
— May Sarton, Journal of a Solitude, 1973

Weeding by Laurie Blakeslee

For more than four decades, my mother-in-law Fritz has been gardening the same plot of land (approximately an 1/8 acre) behind her home in Boise, Idaho. Her children say they can hardly believe she maintained such a huge garden when she worked full time. Despite their protests to scale back the ambitious planting, each year the garden seems to expand. In the tremendous heat of late summer, even Fritz will admit she is overwhelmed by the work. Fortunately, my partner Stephanie shares her mother’s love of gardening and works alongside her.

For Fritz, this vegetable garden not only provides food for her family (and her lucky neighbors), it also allows a space for meditation through the ritual of daily maintenance. It is clear that, as Fritz, now in her mid 80s, grows older, this garden provides a way to maintain her vitality. With the series “40-Year Garden” I am photographing a garden in all its seasons of transformation and the beauty of Fritz with her resilience and determination.

Bio  Laurie Blakeslee has worked in photo-based media for over 20 years. She has exhibited nationally and internationally. Her work is held in many collections including: Boise Art Museum, Center for Creative Photography UA Tucson AZ, Colorado University, Rutgers Center for Innovative Print and Paper, University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Laurie is currently an Associate Professor of Art at BSU, where she teaches photography and coordinates the undergraduate Art Foundations program. She received a BFA from Boise State University with an emphasis in painting and an MFA in photography from the University of Arizona in Tucson.

Lisa Redburn, Water Tapestries

Blackberry Lily Ballet by Lisa Redburn

Lisa Redburn is drawn to water where the boundaries between real and reflected are fluid. Water Tapestries began as she wandered in nature, observing swamps and streams. She focused on the relationships among reflected light, decaying plant material, surface texture, and the mysteries hiding below. She saw these images as “water tapestries.”

Over time the series evolved into more intentional work, in her own garden. She made a ritual of gathering a handful of buds, petals, leaves, and seedpods, then scattering them over a basin of water. She watched them bob and sink, gently floating into and away from each  other. The process of creating these images in her garden wove together two strands of her creative life: gardener and photographer. “The botanica mingling in the water and the trees reflected there were old friends, seen in new ways.”  Through this series, Redburn explores the tension between fluid and fixed, visible and invisible, control and serendipity, what is passing and what is to come. She has since moved, but ephemera from the garden she created live on in her photography.  

Bio:  Lisa Redburn is a fine-art photographer whose work explores the fluid boundaries between the real, reflected, and remembered. She finds layered stories in the puddles of Paris, ponds and bogs, botanica, and the patina of time.
Lisa’s work has appeared in numerous juried shows, nationally, including Monmouth Museum, Monmouth NJ and the Griffin Museum of Photography, Winchester MA. She has received international recognition including: finalist in both the Pollux Awards and in the Julia Margaret Cameron Award for Women Photographers; Juror’s Award of Merit in the Grand Prix de la Decouverte 2013 International Fine Art Competition; Best of Show in Reflections 2014 at the Photography Center of Cape Cod, and 3rd place in Viewpoints 2016 at Aljira Gallery, Newark NJ. Her images have appeared in Photo Review, Lens Work’s “Seeing in Sixes,” YourDailyPhotograph.com and donttakepictures.com.
Lisa has work in the Sloan Kettering Ambulatory Care Center in Lincroft, NJ, and in private collections. She recently moved to Plymouth, MA from Montclair, NJ.


Memories of Childhood

Michal Greenboim

Kev Filmore

 Portfolio Showcase 
Flynn Larsen and Leslie Jean-Bart

Exhibition Dates:
April 7 to May 6, 2018

Opening Reception:
Saturday, April 7
, 5-7 pm  

Michal Greenboim, Orchard Trail   
(see all Greenboim prints in show)

Baby Lips Shell by Michal Goldboim

Baby Lips Shell by Michal Greenboim

Parking Piano Lesson by Michal Greenboim

Parking Piano Lesson by Michal Greenboim

Kev Filmore, 21 Magnolia Road
(see all Filmore work in show)

Mom Needs Help by Kev Filmore

Mom Needs Help by Kev Filmore

Dad's Ice by Kev Filmore

Dad’s Ice by Kev Filmore


Portfolio Showcase

Flynn Larsen, 
Memories of Childhood: Portraits and Still Lifes
(see all Larsen prints in show)

Kinderharten Day 1 by Flynn Larsen

Kindergarten Day 1 by Flynn Larsen


Leslie Jean-Bart, Memories of Childhood By The Sea
(see all Jean-Bart prints in show)

Friendship By The Sea by Leslie Jean-Bart

Friendship By The Sea by Leslie Jean-Bart





About the ART and the ARTISTS

Michal Greenboim, Orchard Trail

Hello-Leaf by Michal Greenboim

Hello-Leaf by Michal Greenboim

In “Orchard Trail” Michal Greenboim creates photographic diptychs. These photographs were taken as individual images over the years, as daily responses to the world around her, as in a visual journal, and later paired. In examining the photographs she realized that she “had subconsciously been photographing [her] childhood.” She says, “The pictures in front of me held deep memories of curiosity, innocence and wonder. They were my remembrances, wandering in the backyard, exploring moments like the sound of a tree [or] a bird in the sky.”

She grew up in a small town in Israel called Pardes Chana that means Hana Orchard. She says of her childhood “the town was full of orange, avocado and mango orchards. I remember neighbors stopping by with mangos and [we] giving our avocados in exchange. Kids would walk by themselves to the next-door-neighbors for story time or a piano lesson. I remember going with my father to pick oranges from our orchard. When I look at my photographs …, I am reminded of who I truly am.”

Bio:  Michal Greenboim developed an early interest in photography after watching her grandfather, who always had a camera present to capture family moments. Following a career as an interior designer and computer engineer, she later moved into photography, publishing her first photography book “Orchard Trail,” a narrative of childhood stories and memories, in 2016.Greenboim has exhibited her work in shows across the United States, including a recent solo exhibition of “Orchard Trail” The Griffin Museum of Photography, Winchester MA. She has also shown her work at the Art of Photography Show in San Diego and at the Los Angeles Center for Photography in California, Photo Place in Vermont, Tilt Gallery in Arizona , Dickerman Gallery in San-Francisco, Orton Davis in Hudson, NY and Fabric project in Los Angeles . Her photograph “Rear Blues” won third place in the “World in Place” competition in the “Sense of Place” category, PDN Magazine, December 2016. In 2017, Greenboim was awarded an exhibition at the Griffin Museum from the Los Angeles Center of Photography.  Greenboim now lives in La Jolla, California and started her MFA studies in June 2017.

Kev Filmore, 21 Magnolia Rd.

Dad, Ice by Kev Filmore

Dad, Ice by Kev Filmore

21 Magnolia Rd. is Kev Filmore’s childhood story about being raised by seemingly successful, but mentally ill parents in the 1960’s. Her mixed media compositions illustrate her search for the truth about her upbringing, which, despite a happy facade, was riddled with addiction, sexual abuse and emotional neglect. Filmore realized early on that life did not have to be miserable.She had two worlds growing up, the one at home and the other one waiting just outside our front door and in her imagination. She learned to see beauty where shadows loomed.

“Examining the stuff of my childhood has revealed, reinforced, and left some questions still unanswered. I put the past back together, along with myself in the process.”

Bio: Kev Filmore, of Hudson-on-Croton NY, began her lifelong love of exploring photographic processes including mix media, while earning a BFA from University of the Arts. Her work has been featured in The New York Times, PDNEDU and PDN’s 2010 Annual. Her Dreamers series received a 2005 Golden Light Award and her Abandoned series earned second place Portfolio by PIEA in 2009. From 2014 through 2018, images from her current series, 21 Magnolia Rd., have been selected for inclusion in exhibitions at Garrison Art Center, Tilt Gallery, The Griffin Museum, Candela Gallery and The Curated Fridge. This project was also featured in October 2017 issue #18 of The HAND Magazine and is in the permanent PhotoPlace Online Gallery for Myths, Legends, and Dreams. Filmore is a Nationally Honored Educator 2016, and was awarded a Vivian Pomex Sabbatical 2017-18.


Selected through our Portfolio Showcase International Call for Entries
the gallery is also featuring portfolios by
Flynn Larsen & Leslie Jean-Bart

Flynn Larsen, Memories of Childhood

Constellation Hippity Hop by Flynn Larsen

Constellation Hippity Hop by Flynn Larsen

Flynn Larsen’s series of images is an interweaving of still life and portraiture, made to preserve the memory of her daughter’s smallness, and the abundance of her imagination. The portraits, woven in among the still lifes, tell the story of the time before her baby brother came along, and after. These photographs are from Larsen’s motherly point of view; as she makes each, she also imagines herself looking at them decades down the line, as if to say to her future self, “remember this? And This? And this?”

Bio: Flynn Larsen, of Beacon NY, has published two books: The Autobiography of an Apartment House (2014), a collaboration with her father exploring stories of the Upper West Side tenants in the building in which was raised, and Nature Morte (2013), a meditation on the quiet emotion of objects and spaces in domestic settings. One of her Cosmic Dust photographs was recently included in a juried group show at the Davis Orton Gallery, in Hudson, NY. She is currently working on a long term series of self-portraits, as well as a project about history and its interpretation, plus continuing her commercial work as a portrait and documentary photographer for a range of clients.

 Larsen was born and raised in New York City, studied English Literature at Carleton College (Northfield, MN), and Photography at Art Center College of Design (Pasadena, CA), returning to New York to start a commercial photography practice.  She lives in Beacon, NY with her husband and two children.

Leslie Jean-Bart, Memories of Childhood By the Sea

The Pull of the Sea by Leslie Jean-Bart

The Pull of the Sea by Leslie Jean-Bart

“The ocean is a magical place to me.” In Haiti, during childhood summers, Leslie Jean-Bart and his older brother would spend countless hours swimming in the ocean, in absolute delight. These memories have nourished and sustained him.  “By the sea side is a place where I can regain my balance, where I can think clearly, where I can create, and where I can be a kid again without caring for even a fraction of a second what others may think or not.

Bio:  Born in Haiti where he acquired his love for the ocean, Leslie Jean-Bart now lives in New York City. He works predominantly in the medium of photography. After earning a master’s degree in Journalism from Columbia University, Jean-Bart was on staff at Sotheby’s and Christies where he was surrounded daily by the world’s greatest art.
Leslie began exhibiting in 2001, when a number of his collages were part of the exhibit “Committed To The Image: Contemporary Black Photographers” at the Brooklyn Museum. From 2001-2003 he took part in a number of group exhibits at Monique Goldstrom Gallery in SoHo, NYC. In 2004 Jean-Bart became the sole caretaker of his mother who has dementia. During one of the most trying period of taking care of his mother, Jean-Bart started “Reality & Imagination”, his ongoing series of eight years. He has since had solos and taken part in group exhibits in NYC and various states in the US.