2018 Exhibitions

On the Photograph
paint, text, stitches and more

Edie Bresler

Nichole Washington

and
 
Portfolio Showcase 
Anne Diggory  & Gail Peachin

Exhibition Dates:
September 22 to October 21, 2018

Reception for Artists: Saturday, September 22, 5-7 pm  


Edie Bresler, Anonymous  
See FlatFile for all Edie Bresler images in show

Man with Wings, mixed media by Edie Bresler

Anonymous man 1880, 2018, Cyanotype on paper with embroidery, 16”x20” by Edie Bresler

Woman - Fall, mixed media by Edie Bresler

Woman – Fall, mixed media by Edie Bresler

Nichole Washington, For My Girls and Other Works   
See FlatFile for all Nichole Washington images in show

For My Girls 2, mixed media by Nichole Washington

I Consider Her My Blood and It Don’t Come No Thicker, Hand painted details on pigment print by Nichole Washington

For My Girls 9 by Nichole Washington

 Noble Sis from Represent series by Nichole Washington


Portfolio Showcase

Selected through our Portfolio Showcase International Call for Entries, 
the gallery will also feature two portfolios

Anne Diggory, Out of Place
See FlatFile for all Anne Diggory work in show

Art Entrance by Anne Diggory

Gail Peachin, Human Form  
See FlatFile for all Gail Peachin work in show

Untitled 1 by Gail Peachin 


About the Artists

Edie Bresler, Anonymous

Girl with Sequins 2, mixed media, by Edie Bresler

Girl with Sequins 2, mixed media, by Edie Bresler

During a year-long illness, Edie Bresler spent more time looking at photographs in books than making them. A series of anonymous nudes from various sources, all made between 1843-1910 entered her consciousness and kept her restless. It was not just the finality of the title, “anonymous”, but wonder about the relationship between photographer and subject. She found herself inventing backstories. Is that a moment of intimacy or a fond remembrance in their gaze? She spent a lot of time imagining what they might have been like outside the photographers studio.

To satisfy her curiosity, she scanned the original reproduction to digitally remove them from the studio. Then printing on clear film she could photograph them against a window onto a landscape or combine the film with traditional darkroom processes such as blue cyanotype. Mirroring her own recovery, she started embroidering, sewing or drawing a costume or blanket as a gesture of renewal and second chances. This project is ongoing.

Bio:  Edie Bresler is a 2017 recipient of a Massachusetts Cultural Council fellowship in Photography. Her photographs have most recently been exhibited at Gallery Kayafas in Boston, International Photography Festival in Pingyao China and Davis Orton Gallery and Photoville in New York. Edie and her projects have been featured on Good Morning America, PBS Greater Boston as well as Photograph Magazine, Slate, Business Insider, Lenscratch, Photo District New and Esquire Russia. She earned a BFA from the School of Visual Arts, NYC and an MFA from LUCAD, Boston. She lives in Somerville, MA with her son and leads the Photography program at Simmons College.

Nichole Washington, For My Girls and Other Works

For My Girls 5, mixed media by Nichole Washington

For My Girls 5, mixed media by Nichole Washington

Nichole Washington creates super-heroine characters that exist in a space where they are respected, loved and protected. She photographs her subjects in confident poses, digitally manipulates the image and then adds bold paint strokes.  Nichole’s strong use of design and bright colors evoke a powerful energy from each piece. She describes the work as a spiritual journey of expressing her inner world amidst pop culture influences. 

For My Girls is a celebration of bold and expressive black women inspired by 1990’s female hip-hop artists. Nichole photographs her subjects in confident poses and adds gouache, hand painted details on top of the prints. In her most recent work Nichole creates unique symbols inspired by Egyptian hieroglyphs and Adinkra symbols. She paints these symbols around her subjects to offer love and protection.

Bio: Nichole Washington is a visual artist living and working in New York.  Nichole’s work is featured in the inaugural issue of MFON: Women Photographers of the African Diaspora. She has exhibited at Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History in Detroit,  Andrew Freedman Home in Bronx, NY, The Untitled Space in Soho New York, and School of Visual Arts – Chelsea Gallery. She has led a self-portrait workshop at Lower East Side Girls Club , spoken on a panel at “Photoville” and has been interviewed on Adobe “Make It”. 

Nichole holds a master’s degree from School of Visual Arts in digital photography and a bachelor’s degree in fashion marketing. 

Portfolio Showcase

Anne Diggory, Out of Place

Opening by Anne Diggory

In Anne Diggory’s hybrid works that combine photography and painting she challenges the conventions of each media as well as the traditions of the usual content of landscapes and still lifes. Varying in size from one to 9 feet wide, each one begins as desire to express her fragmented experience of a real place. She starts by combining photos of that place with photos of artwork, both her own and appropriated images. The resulting print then becomes the basis for further painting.
Diggory’s images are “out of place” in both the sense of being transformations of a real place and for their shifts in location, content, and media.

Bio:  Anne Diggory has worked out of her studio in Saratoga Springs, New York, for almost 40 years. Her work has been seen in over 35 solo exhibitions and 75 group exhibitions in the United States, Panama and Germany. Recently Anne’s hybrid works combining photography and painting were the focus of two solo exhibits — in New York City at the Blue Mountain Gallery and at The Hyde Collection in Glens Falls, NY. That work was featured in the Adirondack Explorer, Saratoga Living and the 2015 photography issue of Adirondack Life “The shifts between painting, photography and digital manipulation continue to be “startling and disorienting, as well as beautiful,” with “mysterious, absorbing blends” (Jay Rogoff, Adirondack Life, March 2015). Diggory’s combination of accurate detail with expressive painting and strong abstract structure are an outgrowth of education at Yale and Indiana University and many years of exploring and painting the natural world. 

Gail Peachin, Human Form

Untitled 2 by Gail Peachin

Gail Peachin finds her base photographs in discarded family albums.  Working with the human form in the snapshot, from the beginning, she knew she wanted to give them new life. At first she removed the form and collaged the empty spaces with black paper.  Wanting to do more, used art magazines, catalogs, gameboards, and maps for textures and patterns to both fill the void and create a balance between the background and the human form. She has also used the removed form and collaged it into other backgrounds. 

Bio: Gail Peachin received her BFA from the Art Institute of Chicago with a major in ceramics.  While raising a family and maintaining a dried flower business, with three partners, she opened Fern, an antique store in Hudson NY. She is now sole owner.  Always interested in the visual relationship between the human form and its environment, “Human Forms” is her first series of photocollages to explore this interest. Gail exhibits and sells work from “Human Form” at Fern in the Antique Warehouse in Hudson NY.


Picturing Mental Illness
design, portraits, still lifes, interiors

Tamara Staples

Kholood Eid

and
 
Portfolio Showcase 
Talya Arbisser & Deyva Arthur

Exhibition Dates: August 18 to September 16, 2018

Reception for Artists: Saturday, August 25, 5-7 pm  


Tamara Staples, Side Effects May Include

Side Effects May Include 2 by Tamara Staples

Side Effects May Include 2 by Tamara Staples

Side Effects May Include 2 by Tamara Staples

Side Effects May Include 1 by Tamara Staples – Wallpaper and Dress

Kholood Eid, Diagnosed

Kevin, diptych prints and audio by Kholood Eid

Kevin, diptych prints and audio by Kholood Eid

Katie, diptych prints and audio by Kholood Eid

Katie, diptych prints and audio by Kholood Eid


Portfolio Showcase

Selected through our Portfolio Showcase International Call for Entries, 
the gallery will also feature two portfolios  

Talya Arbisser, Dybbuks Exposed

L, 35, Davenport IA by Talya Arbisser

L, 35, Davenport IA by Talya Arbisser

Deyva Arthur, Worcester Insane Asylum

Broken Child by Deyva ArthurBroken Child by Deyva Arthur


About the Artists

Tamara Staples, Side Effects May Include

Green Geometric Pill Studio by Tamara Staples

Green Geometric Pill Studio by Tamara Staples

Side Effects May Include is a photography-based installation, a “pill” bedroom that explores the disconnect between mental health challenges and medication; more specifically polypharmacy.

This project was inspired when Staples’ sister took her life with a cocktail of pharmaceuticals after suffering with bi-polar disorder for many years. Following her death, she collected the contents of her medicine cabinet. The pills in the project belonged to her. Staples wondered if the medications were responsible for her demise and this concern led her in a photographic exploration that ended with experiential artwork in the mind-set of activism. This was a departure from the 2-dimensional photography of her past work; the subject matter guided the art form in creating this bedroom, the most intimate space of the house, where we retreat for comfort and rejuvenation.

Additionally, Staples inventoried the 114 pills, both pharmaceuticals and over-the-counter, into a printed hard bound book. A looped video of undulating water surfaces is included, to remind the viewer of the tenuous flow of our physiological selves.

Bio: Tamara Staples’ work has appeared in such publications as Harper’s Magazine, the New York Times, New York Magazine, Town and Country, National Geographic and was featured on NPR’s This American Life and CNN.  She is a fellow of the Rauschenberg Residency (2015) and a two-time recipient of the New York Foundation for the Arts Grant. Her in-depth investigation of Pure-Bred Poultry led to the publication of The Fairest Fowl: Portraits of Championship Chickens (2001) and The Magnificent Chicken: Portraits of the Fairest Fowl (2013).  Tamara’s recent project Side Effects May Include has been shown at the Institute of Contemporary Art San Jose, FAVA Gallery, Oberlin, Ohio, the Davis Orton Gallery in Hudson, NY and will show at Blue Sky Gallery in Portland, Oregon in the fall.  

Kholood Eid, Diagnosed

Theo by Kholood Eid

Theo by Kholood Eid

After being diagnosed with depression in 2013 and prescribed medication, Eid began researching side effects of antidepressants. Eventually, she decided to start talking to folks instead of looking up random statistics and generic descriptions online.

She thought she wanted to learn more about the side effects of medication. Instead, the more she spoke with people, the more she was exposed to the wider scope of mental illness. She learned about different forms of illnesses and disorders and how each manifests itself in a person’s everyday life. She learned how different individuals choose to cope in different ways. And she learned how common it is. For Eid, on a personal level, the feeling of physically advancing the film after each frame and the chance to have these quiet moments to connect with someone offered her an unexpectedly cathartic experience. She felt a little less alone.

Eid recorded conversations with each person. These can be seen/heard in the gallery.

This is an ongoing project.

Bio:  Kholood Eid is a documentary photographer working with stills, audio, video, writing and editing. She also teaches photography to a group of preteens at an after-school program through the Bronx Documentary Center as well as workshops and classes through other programs including NYU. Her work has appeared in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Bloomberg, Reuters, Lifetime, Refinery29, ESPN’s The Undefeated, The Guardian, Quartz, The Denver Post, the Phoenix New Times and a variety of Midwestern publications, with video editing for TIME.com, VSCO and others. She received a masters degree in photojournalism from the University of Missouri in 2015.

Portfolio Showcase

Talya Arbisser, Dybbuks Exposed

B, 30, Bettendorf by Talya Arbisser

B, 30, Bettendorf by Talya Arbisser

In Yiddish folklore, a dybbuk is a malicious spirit sometimes believed to be the soul of a dead person or a little demon that holds you back or keeps you from being your very best. Dybbuk comes from the root word for “stuck” or “stuck on.” As Arbisser considered the idea of the dybbuk for a project on Yiddish folklore, she realized mental health issues and the various dependencies many individuals struggle with might be the “dybbuk” I was contemplating. 

Like a shadow, psychological issues come and go during the course of a lifetime, but they are always a part of that person. Arbisser’s project goal is to destigmatize talking about mental health issues. “Dybbuks Exposed” allows individuals to speak through their shadows – in their own words and handwriting. The more people who speak up, the more likely others will be willing to open up as well.

Bio:  Talya Arbisser is a Houston-based freelance photojournalist and documentary photographer. She has long-term projects focused on individuals with special needs, the aging experience, and Houston’s Art Car scene. Her work has been exhibited in solo and group shows throughout the US and has been published in a variety of media.

Arbisser grew up learning about medical and psychosocial issues from her family. Her parents are retired ophthalmologists and her maternal grandmother was a renowned psychologist. This personal history has informed much of Arbisser’s approach to her documentary subject matter. 

Arbisser holds a BA in sociology and a concentration in visual studies from Cornell University, as well as a certificate in photojournalism and documentary photography from the International Center of Photography. She is currently working towards a certificate in patient advocacy through UCLA online.

Deyva Arthur, Worcester Insane Asylum

Restraint by Deyva Arthur

Restraint by Deyva Arthur

This series of collages combine photographs Arthur took at the Worcester State Mental Hospital in Massachusetts, which had been abandoned for years, and glass plate images of its patients. At one time, the hospital had been a self-sufficient institution, growing its own food, and housing thousands of patients including children. Almost one hundred years later the Asylum closed down as if in a hurry, leaving behind, furniture, treatment equipment, case files, and the unsettled phantoms of the patients who stayed there. 

These images tell the stories of mental illness – schizophrenia, depression, and paranoia. And they tell of individuals, imprisoned, ostracized, and abused by a culture who labeled them not with an illness but as an illness. Some were merely sent to the asylum for being outspoken, others were imprisoned for being from another country or because they were a woman. 

Bio:  For more than 20 years Deyva Arthur has been photographing the quiet beauty of everyday life. She has also worked extensively in the field of mental health. Her photographs have been exhibited in shows throughout the US. She has received numerous awards  including the Mohawk Hudson Artist Regional and the Capital District’s Photo Regional. She has written and illustrated four children’s books and has put together a collection of poetry. Arthur has been the managing editor for the Green Party’s national newspaper and handled communications for her local NAACP. Her work history includes: journalist, photographer, film editor, housing organizer, environmental researcher, counselor for refugees, mentally ill and the homeless, secretary, construction worker, and sheep farmer. She is mother of two children in Troy, New York. 


Fourth Annual Group Show

Juror: Paula Tognarelli
Executive Director & Curator: Griffin Museum of Photography

Reception for Artists
Saturday, July 14, 5-7 pm

Exhibition Dates: July 14 – August 12, 2018
SHOW CATALOG

4th Annual Group Show, Davis Orton Gallery

4th Annual Group Show, Davis Orton Gallery

•Amy Anderson   •Susan Anthony   •Michael Bogdanffy-Kriegh
Linda Cassidy   •Frank Curran   •Sandi Daniel
Harvey Davidowitz  •Nina Weinberg Doran   •Ken Dreyfack
Melissa Eder  •Benjamin Ernest  •Diane Fenster
•Dennis Geller  •Nadide Goksun  •Paul Greenberg
•John Harris  •Susan Higgins  •Rohina Hoffman
•Leslie Jean-Bart  •Marcy Juran  •Karen Klinedinst
•Pierre-Yves Linot  •Joyce P Lopez  •Jennifer Lothrigel
•James Mahoney  •Alina Marin-Bliach  •John Matturri
•Mahala Mazerov  •Miao Miao  •John Patrick  Naughton
•Diana Nicholette Jeon  •Neil Nourse  •Jane Paradise
•Louise Pedno  •Michael Prais  •Russ Rowland
•Joshua Sarinana  •Andi Schreiber  •Amy Shapiro
•Leslie Sheryll  •Rebecca Skinner  •Larry Snider
•Jean Sousa  •Michael Stepansky  •JP Terlizzi
•Marie Triller   •Allison Welch   •Stephen Wicks
•Caren Winnal   •Carol Wontkowsky   •Yelena Zhavoronkova

4th Annual Group Show in galleries of Davis Orton Gallery

4th Annual Group Show in galleries of Davis Orton Gallery


Landscapes: Abstract, Fractured, Suggested

Margaret Saliske

David Drake

Portfolio Showcase 
Barrack Evans and William Nourse

Exhibition Dates:
June 16 to July 8, 2018

Reception for Artists: Saturday, June 16, 5-7 pm 


Margaret Saliske – mixed media

for all Margaret’s works in exhibition, see FlatFile- Margaret Saliske


“Site 1″, 14″ x 19”, inkjet, masonite, plexiglas by Margaret Saliske 

"Fioli," 2016, 14"h x 13"w, 3"d, inkjet, aluminum by Margaret Saliske

“Fioli,” 2016, 14″h x 13″w, 3″d, inkjet, aluminum by Margaret Saliske

David Drake – mixed media, painting

for all David’s works in exhibition, see FlatFile – David Drake

"To Advocate" 11"x17", graphite and acrylic on bristol by David Drake

“To Advocate” 11″x17″, graphite and acrylic on bristol by David Drake

by David Drake

Edges Evening, 19″ x 24″, acrylic and pastel on bristol by David Drake


Portfolio Showcase

Selected through our Portfolio Showcase International Call for Entries, 
the gallery will also feature two portfolios  

Barrack Evans, Iceland, the road to Höfn

for all Barrack’s photographs in exhibition, see FlatFile – Barrack Evans

Blue Wall by Barrack Evans

Blue Wall by Barrack Evans

William Nourse, Detachment

for all William’s photographs in exhibition, see FlatFile – William Nourse

Terra Incognita XVIII by William Nourse

Terra Incognita XVIII by William Nourse 


About the Artists

Margaret Saliske, Recent Work

Yellow and Blue by Margaret Saliske, inkjet and aluminum

Yellow and Blue, 11″w x 4.5″d x 17″h  by Margaret Saliske, inkjet and aluminum

Artist Margaret Saliske of Hudson NY is interested in manipulating how we see the natural world and man made objects that reside in it. How structure can alter depth of field and create a new setting for what is familiar.

Saliske uses photographic images of landscapes, architecture and industrial sites . The landscapes, though flat photographic images, become 3 dimensional again by cutting, folding, creating new planes and spaces that juxtapose the natural imagery.

Most recently she has become interested in how architecture and industrial structures are situated in the landscape. She has been photographing sites and then removing, reiterating and reimagining elements in a new format . They are abstracted yet still relate to the initial image generating a new space devoid of landscape.

Bio:  Margaret Saliske lived and worked in New York City until moving to the Hudson River Valley in 1989. Recent group exhibitions include Samuel Dorsky Museum of Art, New Paltz NY; Opalka Gallery, Albany NY, Graficas Gallery, Nantucket MA; Carrie Haddad Photographs and Carrie Haddad Gallery, Hudson NY. Saliske has been represented by Stafford Contemporary and Graficas Gallery. She has a B.A. degree from Bennington College and attended the Whitney Museum of American Art Independent Study Program in Studio Art.

David Drake, Recent Work

Sluggish, 19″ x 24″, graphite pencil on bristol by David Drake

Sluggish, 19″ x 24″, graphite pencil on bristol by David Drake

Having studied printmaking, David Drake is more attracted to the drawing process as a way in to both his drawings and paintings. For him, drawing is a way of interpreting the world; the importance of “feeling” what you are drawing as it comes to life is paramount. Moving back and forth between drawing and painting, Drake will stay with a single object or idea, expanding or contracting the world around it through a series of works.

Drake’s recent work started out as an exercise in improvisation that evolved into “something like “landscape.” Drake prefers not to plan but rather, be open and receptive—to improvise, to start something before he knows what it’s going to be.

Drake likes to leave clues to his thought processes—like when he decides to move a line that he has drawn in pencil, creating a sense of motion because you can still see the pale shadow of the old line. “You can erase a line, but it leaves a ghost.” He likes the chaotic feeling that comes from all the apparent indecision and ambiguity as he works, but he also likes the resolution that comes as its final state evolves out of what were just squiggles and patience.
Thanks to Stephen Leon for sharing info with the gallery. For an extended interview with Drake, see Stephen Leon Blog

Bio: David Drake of Catskill NY, and longtime resident of Hudson NY, received his BFA in printmaking with a minor in photography from the Cleveland Institute of Art where he studied with Carroll Cassil, Ralph Woehrmann and Robert Jergens. After graduating, he taught photography in Cleveland Public Schools and began a life long practice of painting and drawing. While earning his degree in printmaking, Drake waited tables and bartended, skills that carried him through the financial ups and downs of life as an artist. (Currently he bartends at the restaurant Rive Gauche Bistro in Athens).

Previous solo exhibitions include Davis Orton Gallery, Hudson NY and Cabane Gallery, Phoenicia NY. Among the galleries he has exhibited are the Maryland Federation of Art, Annapolis MD; Neville Sargeant Gallery, Chicago IL; Southern Vermont Art Center, Manchester VT. His work is represented in private and corporate collections throughout the country.

Portfolio Showcase

Barrack Evans, Iceland, the road to Höfn

Iceberg by Barrack Evans

Iceberg by Barrack Evans

In 2012, Barrack Evans saw the James Balog documentary, Chasing Ice, about photographing receding glaciers all over the world. He knew he needed to see these massive rivers of ice before their wonder melted into the oceans.  Five years later, he travelled to Iceland to drive 500 km along it’s southeast coast past Vatnajökull Glacier, Europe’s largest glacier, to Vestrahorn Mountain near Höfn and photograph some of the same glaciers that so dramatically demonstrate the effects of global warming on our planet. 

He drove the ring road, living out of a camper with no schedule to keep except a midweek reservation for a zodiac boat tour on the Jökulsárlón lagoon. The landscapes are not only glaciers but also lagoons and icebergs left behind as a result of glacial retreat. Vatnajökull National Park is surrounded by the black sand beaches of Diamond Beach and getting there takes you along moss covered lava fields, past ancient sea cliffs, waterfalls, rivers and canyons formed by progressive erosion. Vatnajökull has deglaciated by about 10% since the end of the 19th century, 3% lost in just the last 10 years. Any return to Iceland would be to a new and altered landscape of diminished glaciers.

Bio: After over 30 years of managing Non-Profit and Off-Broadway theatre companies, Barrack Evans has returned to his home state, Vermont, where he is a fine art photographer based in Dorset and the proud new owner/operator of Battenkill Bicycles in Manchester, VT. Balancing life as an artist and bicycle shop owner/cyclist, he photographs a range of subjects in Vermont and travels when he can to locations from Yosemite National Park to Vatnajökull National Park in Iceland. His photographs have been exhibited in solo and group shows at the Southern Vermont Art Center, Manchester, Vermont.

Barrack Evans is a graduate of Ithaca College with a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Theatre Production Arts. He has studied photography at the International Center for Photography in New York City and the Griffin Museum of Photography in Winchester, MA.

William Nourse, Detachment

Terra Incognita XXXIII by William Nourse

Terra Incognita XXXIII by William Nourse 

While landscape photography often concentrates on showing beauty or drama with context such as a grand landscape in the mountains, William Nourse is deliberately focused on taking that context away from the viewer. Shot in the Gobi Desert in November 2017, there is no sense of scale, and orientation of the images feels arbitrary, rather than conforming to traditional landscape standards. By detaching the images from their context, he forces the viewer to ask the question ‘what am I looking at?’ and come to her own conclusions.

Bio: Will Nourse is a landscape photographer known for his use of color and texture to bring his outdoor experiences to life.

His work reflects a lifetime of hiking, backpacking, climbing, skiing and sailing, all of which have given him a deep appreciation for the wonders of the natural world.  He was a featured artist in the exhibition ‘Expeditions: From Iceland to the Gobi’ at the Paula Estey Gallery, Newburyport, MA. In 2017 he was selected for the Cambridge Art Association’s National Prize Show (2017), and his image ‘Seljalandsfoss #2’ was selected as Best in Show for Photography in the NAA’s 20th Annual Regional Juried Show (2017). Nourse resides in Amesbury, MA.

 


In the Garden: Public, Private, Spiritual

Vaughn Sills

Sarah Sterling

Portfolio Showcase 
Laurie Blakeslee and Lisa Redburn

Exhibition Dates:
May 12 to June 10, 2018

Reception for Artists: Saturday, May 12, 5-7 pm 


Vaughn Sills, Places for the Spirit:
Traditional African American Gardens in the South

for all images in Vaughn Sill’s show: Vaughn Sills FlatFile

Annie Belle Sturgehill's Garden, Athens, Georgia, 1988 by Vaughn Sills

Annie Belle Sturgehill’s Garden, Athens, Georgia, 1988 by Vaughn Sills

 

Annie Belle Sturghill, Athens, Georgia, 1988 by Vaughn Sills

Annie Belle Sturghill, Athens, Georgia, 1988 by Vaughn Sills

Pearl Fryer's Garden Bishopville, North Carolina, 2002 by Vaughn Sills

Pearl Fryer’s Garden Bishopville, North Carolina, 2002 by Vaughn Sills

Sarah Sterling, Cultivated Chaos

For all images in Sarah Sterling’s show, Sarah Sterling FlatFile 

Swallowtail and Lily by Sarah Sterling

Swallowtail and Lily by Sarah Sterling

 

Humingbird and Flowers by Sarah Sterling

Humingbird and Flowers by Sarah Sterling

Junco in Snow by Sarah Sterling

Junco in Snow by Sarah Sterling

Portfolio Showcase

Laurie Blakeslee, 40 Year Garden

For all images in Laurie Blakeslee’s portfolio: Laurie Blakeslee Flatfile

Planting Leeks by Laurie Blakeslee

Planting Leeks by Laurie Blakeslee

Lisa Redburn, Water Tapestries

For all the images in Lisa Redburn’s Portfolio: Lisa Redburn Flatfile

Early Summer, Triptych by Lisa Redburn

Early Summer, Triptych by Lisa Redburn

About the Artists

Vaughn Sills, Places for the Spirit:
Traditional African American Gardens in the South

Bea Robinson, Athens, Georgia by Vaughn Sills

Bea Robinson, Athens, Georgia by Vaughn Sills

One early September afternoon in 1988,  Vaughn Sills found herself on the porch of Bea Robinson’s house in Athens, Georgia. While her friend and Bea chatted about their lives, she looked around and became entranced by Bea’s garden. “Something came over me – or through me – as I stood in the garden, looking, feeling, sensing the energy or magic or spirit, call it what you will, that surrounded me.” On that warm, soft, sunny day, Sills took the first of what became a series of photographs, from throughout the South, that she worked on for nearly twenty years.

Sills’ series, Places of the Spirit, documents a tradition that is a way of using the land that is both historically significant and aesthetically resonant. Scholars have studied African American gardens and traced many of their traits to Africa, pointing out similar uses of the land and finding that slaves brought with them not only plant seeds, but agricultural expertise, some of it still in evidence today.

These gardens speak a certain language – a language, Sills is convinced, that is about the earth, about beauty, and about spirit.” Some of the vocabulary of this language is about belief and spiritual knowledge – the empty bottles, the pipes sticking upright out of the ground, dolls – and have specific meanings that relate to the spirits of ancestors or magical powers and that go back centuries and across an ocean; some of the vocabulary is functional, practical, born of necessity – the vegetable gardens, the chicken coops; and some is quite simply of beauty – the impatiens and petunias and pinks, the rose bushes, prickly pears, and canna lilies. The way the vocabulary is put together is based on tradition, custom, function, and each gardener’s sense of what looks pleasing – in a special and recognizable style. This style becomes the structure of the language; this structure is aesthetic; and this aesthetic is beauty. 

The Book: Places for the Spirit

Places for the Spirit
Trinity University Press
San Antonio TX

“Looking at these black and white images sometimes feels like dropping paper flowers in a glass of water and watching them expand. Vaughn Sills’s images make the mind expand like a rose, fragrant with vision…. [Her] humility in the face of the order she finds in these various gardens is touching – and enlightening.”      –Hilton Als

“Sills, who took these photographs in Georgia, the two Carolinas, Louisiana, [Mississippi], and Alabama, includes the location in each title. How could she not, these images are so idiosyncratically — so wondrously — specific. That said, they also convey a sense of being beyond place — and outside of time. Humanity, the Bible says, started in a garden. Looking at these photographs, one can see how it continues in gardens, too.”        
–Mark Feeney, The Boston Globe 

Two photographs from this body of work are in the gorgeous new book, 
The Photographer in the Garden, 
published jointly by Aperture and the George Eastman House

Bio: Vaughn Sills’ work has been has been exhibited widely, in museums and galleries; the galleries of botanic gardens; and are in the collections of the DeCordova Museum, Harvard Art Museum, the Eaton Vance Collection, among others. Sills has received several significant awards — twice she received the Artist’s Fellowship in Photography by the Massachusetts Cultural Council; other grants and awards have come from the Artadia Dialogue for Art and Culture, the Polaroid Foundation, and The New England Foundation for the Arts.

Her photographs and books, Places for the Spirit, Traditional African American Gardens (2010) and One Family (2001) earned awards from the Garden Writers Association and the Magazine Association for the Southeast.

Vaughn is a Visiting Scholar at Brandeis University’s Women’s Studies Research Center and Associate Professor Emerita of Photography at Simmons College. She lives and works in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and Prince Edward Island, Canada.

Sarah Sterling, Cultivated Chaos

Goldfinch and Redbud by Sarah Sterling

Goldfinch and Redbud by Sarah Sterling

In Cultivated Chaos, Sarah Sterling documents the ongoing evolution of her Hudson NY garden—its metamorphoses through the seasons, along with its avian and insect visitors. As she seeks out the often unseen mysteries of the garden—ephemeral moments of exuberance and reflection, she creates unusual compositions and color combinations that suit her painterly vision. Sterling has learned over the years that her photographs, no matter how carefully planned, must yield to the plants which have their own agenda, creating the cheerful chaos that becomes the foreground, or background, of each composition. 

Bio: Sarah Sterling of Hudson NY is an award winning photographer who has exhibited her work widely in the Hudson Valley region. Venues include Spencertown Academy galleries, John Davis Gallery, Hudson Area Library, Earle Mitchell Gallery, Davis Orton Gallery, Hudson Opera House, Berkshire Museum and Columbia Green Community College. Among her projects are “The Meadow”, an ongoing photo essay, Flower/Garden Abstract Series, and, individually, Birds, Dragonflies, and Insects.  

Selected through our Portfolio Showcase International Call for Entries
the gallery is also featuring portfolios by
Laurie Blakeslee & Lisa Redburn

Laurie Blakeskee, 40 Year Garden

The garden is growth and change and that means loss as well as constant new treasures to make up for a few disasters.
— May Sarton, Journal of a Solitude, 1973

Weeding by Laurie Blakeslee

For more than four decades, my mother-in-law Fritz has been gardening the same plot of land (approximately an 1/8 acre) behind her home in Boise, Idaho. Her children say they can hardly believe she maintained such a huge garden when she worked full time. Despite their protests to scale back the ambitious planting, each year the garden seems to expand. In the tremendous heat of late summer, even Fritz will admit she is overwhelmed by the work. Fortunately, my partner Stephanie shares her mother’s love of gardening and works alongside her.

For Fritz, this vegetable garden not only provides food for her family (and her lucky neighbors), it also allows a space for meditation through the ritual of daily maintenance. It is clear that, as Fritz, now in her mid 80s, grows older, this garden provides a way to maintain her vitality. With the series “40-Year Garden” I am photographing a garden in all its seasons of transformation and the beauty of Fritz with her resilience and determination.

Bio  Laurie Blakeslee has worked in photo-based media for over 20 years. She has exhibited nationally and internationally. Her work is held in many collections including: Boise Art Museum, Center for Creative Photography UA Tucson AZ, Colorado University, Rutgers Center for Innovative Print and Paper, University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Laurie is currently an Associate Professor of Art at BSU, where she teaches photography and coordinates the undergraduate Art Foundations program. She received a BFA from Boise State University with an emphasis in painting and an MFA in photography from the University of Arizona in Tucson.

Lisa Redburn, Water Tapestries

Blackberry Lily Ballet by Lisa Redburn

Lisa Redburn is drawn to water where the boundaries between real and reflected are fluid. Water Tapestries began as she wandered in nature, observing swamps and streams. She focused on the relationships among reflected light, decaying plant material, surface texture, and the mysteries hiding below. She saw these images as “water tapestries.”

Over time the series evolved into more intentional work, in her own garden. She made a ritual of gathering a handful of buds, petals, leaves, and seedpods, then scattering them over a basin of water. She watched them bob and sink, gently floating into and away from each  other. The process of creating these images in her garden wove together two strands of her creative life: gardener and photographer. “The botanica mingling in the water and the trees reflected there were old friends, seen in new ways.”  Through this series, Redburn explores the tension between fluid and fixed, visible and invisible, control and serendipity, what is passing and what is to come. She has since moved, but ephemera from the garden she created live on in her photography.  

Bio:  Lisa Redburn is a fine-art photographer whose work explores the fluid boundaries between the real, reflected, and remembered. She finds layered stories in the puddles of Paris, ponds and bogs, botanica, and the patina of time.
Lisa’s work has appeared in numerous juried shows, nationally, including Monmouth Museum, Monmouth NJ and the Griffin Museum of Photography, Winchester MA. She has received international recognition including: finalist in both the Pollux Awards and in the Julia Margaret Cameron Award for Women Photographers; Juror’s Award of Merit in the Grand Prix de la Decouverte 2013 International Fine Art Competition; Best of Show in Reflections 2014 at the Photography Center of Cape Cod, and 3rd place in Viewpoints 2016 at Aljira Gallery, Newark NJ. Her images have appeared in Photo Review, Lens Work’s “Seeing in Sixes,” YourDailyPhotograph.com and donttakepictures.com.
Lisa has work in the Sloan Kettering Ambulatory Care Center in Lincroft, NJ, and in private collections. She recently moved to Plymouth, MA from Montclair, NJ.


Memories of Childhood

Michal Greenboim

Kev Filmore

 Portfolio Showcase 
Flynn Larsen and Leslie Jean-Bart

Exhibition Dates:
April 7 to May 6, 2018

Opening Reception:
Saturday, April 7
, 5-7 pm  

Michal Greenboim, Orchard Trail   
(see all Greenboim prints in show)

Baby Lips Shell by Michal Goldboim

Baby Lips Shell by Michal Greenboim

Parking Piano Lesson by Michal Greenboim

Parking Piano Lesson by Michal Greenboim

Kev Filmore, 21 Magnolia Road
(see all Filmore work in show)

Mom Needs Help by Kev Filmore

Mom Needs Help by Kev Filmore

Dad's Ice by Kev Filmore

Dad’s Ice by Kev Filmore


Portfolio Showcase

Flynn Larsen, 
Memories of Childhood: Portraits and Still Lifes
(see all Larsen prints in show)

Kinderharten Day 1 by Flynn Larsen

Kindergarten Day 1 by Flynn Larsen


Leslie Jean-Bart, Memories of Childhood By The Sea
(see all Jean-Bart prints in show)

Friendship By The Sea by Leslie Jean-Bart

Friendship By The Sea by Leslie Jean-Bart





About the ART and the ARTISTS

Michal Greenboim, Orchard Trail

Hello-Leaf by Michal Greenboim

Hello-Leaf by Michal Greenboim

In “Orchard Trail” Michal Greenboim creates photographic diptychs. These photographs were taken as individual images over the years, as daily responses to the world around her, as in a visual journal, and later paired. In examining the photographs she realized that she “had subconsciously been photographing [her] childhood.” She says, “The pictures in front of me held deep memories of curiosity, innocence and wonder. They were my remembrances, wandering in the backyard, exploring moments like the sound of a tree [or] a bird in the sky.”

She grew up in a small town in Israel called Pardes Chana that means Hana Orchard. She says of her childhood “the town was full of orange, avocado and mango orchards. I remember neighbors stopping by with mangos and [we] giving our avocados in exchange. Kids would walk by themselves to the next-door-neighbors for story time or a piano lesson. I remember going with my father to pick oranges from our orchard. When I look at my photographs …, I am reminded of who I truly am.”

Bio:  Michal Greenboim developed an early interest in photography after watching her grandfather, who always had a camera present to capture family moments. Following a career as an interior designer and computer engineer, she later moved into photography, publishing her first photography book “Orchard Trail,” a narrative of childhood stories and memories, in 2016.Greenboim has exhibited her work in shows across the United States, including a recent solo exhibition of “Orchard Trail” The Griffin Museum of Photography, Winchester MA. She has also shown her work at the Art of Photography Show in San Diego and at the Los Angeles Center for Photography in California, Photo Place in Vermont, Tilt Gallery in Arizona , Dickerman Gallery in San-Francisco, Orton Davis in Hudson, NY and Fabric project in Los Angeles . Her photograph “Rear Blues” won third place in the “World in Place” competition in the “Sense of Place” category, PDN Magazine, December 2016. In 2017, Greenboim was awarded an exhibition at the Griffin Museum from the Los Angeles Center of Photography.  Greenboim now lives in La Jolla, California and started her MFA studies in June 2017.

Kev Filmore, 21 Magnolia Rd.

Dad, Ice by Kev Filmore

Dad, Ice by Kev Filmore

21 Magnolia Rd. is Kev Filmore’s childhood story about being raised by seemingly successful, but mentally ill parents in the 1960’s. Her mixed media compositions illustrate her search for the truth about her upbringing, which, despite a happy facade, was riddled with addiction, sexual abuse and emotional neglect. Filmore realized early on that life did not have to be miserable.She had two worlds growing up, the one at home and the other one waiting just outside our front door and in her imagination. She learned to see beauty where shadows loomed.

“Examining the stuff of my childhood has revealed, reinforced, and left some questions still unanswered. I put the past back together, along with myself in the process.”

Bio: Kev Filmore, of Hudson-on-Croton NY, began her lifelong love of exploring photographic processes including mix media, while earning a BFA from University of the Arts. Her work has been featured in The New York Times, PDNEDU and PDN’s 2010 Annual. Her Dreamers series received a 2005 Golden Light Award and her Abandoned series earned second place Portfolio by PIEA in 2009. From 2014 through 2018, images from her current series, 21 Magnolia Rd., have been selected for inclusion in exhibitions at Garrison Art Center, Tilt Gallery, The Griffin Museum, Candela Gallery and The Curated Fridge. This project was also featured in October 2017 issue #18 of The HAND Magazine and is in the permanent PhotoPlace Online Gallery for Myths, Legends, and Dreams. Filmore is a Nationally Honored Educator 2016, and was awarded a Vivian Pomex Sabbatical 2017-18.


Selected through our Portfolio Showcase International Call for Entries
the gallery is also featuring portfolios by
Flynn Larsen & Leslie Jean-Bart

Flynn Larsen, Memories of Childhood

Constellation Hippity Hop by Flynn Larsen

Constellation Hippity Hop by Flynn Larsen

Flynn Larsen’s series of images is an interweaving of still life and portraiture, made to preserve the memory of her daughter’s smallness, and the abundance of her imagination. The portraits, woven in among the still lifes, tell the story of the time before her baby brother came along, and after. These photographs are from Larsen’s motherly point of view; as she makes each, she also imagines herself looking at them decades down the line, as if to say to her future self, “remember this? And This? And this?”

Bio: Flynn Larsen, of Beacon NY, has published two books: The Autobiography of an Apartment House (2014), a collaboration with her father exploring stories of the Upper West Side tenants in the building in which was raised, and Nature Morte (2013), a meditation on the quiet emotion of objects and spaces in domestic settings. One of her Cosmic Dust photographs was recently included in a juried group show at the Davis Orton Gallery, in Hudson, NY. She is currently working on a long term series of self-portraits, as well as a project about history and its interpretation, plus continuing her commercial work as a portrait and documentary photographer for a range of clients.

 Larsen was born and raised in New York City, studied English Literature at Carleton College (Northfield, MN), and Photography at Art Center College of Design (Pasadena, CA), returning to New York to start a commercial photography practice.  She lives in Beacon, NY with her husband and two children.

Leslie Jean-Bart, Memories of Childhood By the Sea

The Pull of the Sea by Leslie Jean-Bart

The Pull of the Sea by Leslie Jean-Bart

“The ocean is a magical place to me.” In Haiti, during childhood summers, Leslie Jean-Bart and his older brother would spend countless hours swimming in the ocean, in absolute delight. These memories have nourished and sustained him.  “By the sea side is a place where I can regain my balance, where I can think clearly, where I can create, and where I can be a kid again without caring for even a fraction of a second what others may think or not.

Bio:  Born in Haiti where he acquired his love for the ocean, Leslie Jean-Bart now lives in New York City. He works predominantly in the medium of photography. After earning a master’s degree in Journalism from Columbia University, Jean-Bart was on staff at Sotheby’s and Christies where he was surrounded daily by the world’s greatest art.
Leslie began exhibiting in 2001, when a number of his collages were part of the exhibit “Committed To The Image: Contemporary Black Photographers” at the Brooklyn Museum. From 2001-2003 he took part in a number of group exhibits at Monique Goldstrom Gallery in SoHo, NYC. In 2004 Jean-Bart became the sole caretaker of his mother who has dementia. During one of the most trying period of taking care of his mother, Jean-Bart started “Reality & Imagination”, his ongoing series of eight years. He has since had solos and taken part in group exhibits in NYC and various states in the US.