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2017 Exhibitions April 8 to December 23


Flora*

Carla Shapiro

Carol March

Exhibition Dates: April 8 to May 14, 2017
Reception for Artists: Saturday, April 8, 5-7pm
also: Gallery Stroll Belo3rd

Portfolio Showcase
Emily Hamilton Laux & Michael Bogdanffy-Kriegh

*To add to the Flora experience
the gallery is also exhibiting Birch Tree Lamps by George Pollack

Carla Shapiro, To Capture a Shadow  (more – flat file)

A Deep Dreamless Sleep, sanded platinum/palladium print by Carla Shapiro

A Deep Dreamless Sleep, sanded platinum/palladium print by Carla Shapiro

Lull us like a dream, platinum print by Carla Shapiro

Lull us like a dream, platinum/palladium print by Carla Shapiro

Carol March, Bloom    (more – flat file)

Bask, pigment print by Carol March

Bask, pigment print by Carol March

Query, pigment print by Carol March

Query, pigment print by Carol March

Portfolio Showcase  Theme: Flora

Emily Hamilton Laux, Invasives: Beauty vs Beauty  (more – flat file)

Japanese Knotweed Fern by Emily Hamilton Laux

Japanese Knotweed Fern by Emily Hamilton Laux

Michael Bogdanffy-Kriegh, Meditations: Flora    (more – flat file)

20140730 183 Block Island by Michael Bogdanffy-Kriegh

20140730 183 Block Island by Michael Bogdanffy-Kriegh

About the Artists

Carla Shapiro, To Capture a Shadow

Nothing is Truly Nothing by Carla Shapiro

Nothing is Truly Nothing by Carla Shapiro

Carla Shapiro initiated this body of work in response to personal loss. In silence and solitude, she began photographing the trees around her, their beauty, a balm for her sorrow. In the studio, out of frustration and intermittent waves of grief, she started scratching her negatives and platinum/palladium prints with sandpaper, rubbing the surfaces as both an act of destruction and an attempt to expunge her deepest emotions. Ironically, the damage she inflicted went beyond catharsis. It transformed her images into magical illuminations.

Shapiro prints her images in platinum/palladium, a 19th century technique where the emulsion is absorbed into the fiber of the paper. Platinum/palladium prints are known for their rich tones, archival stability and unique impressions.

Bio: Carla Shapiro of upstate New York has been a visual artist working in photography for over twenty-five years. Her portfolios include photographic, mixed media and multi-media explorations about woman, aging, longing, beauty and decay.

Carla’s work has been shown nationally and internationally.  She has received numerous awards including The Center for Photography at Woodstock, The Golden Light Awards at Maine Photographic Workshops, New Jersey Council on the Arts, New York Foundation for the Arts, (2 times), and The O’Conner Foundation. She has attended many artists’ residencies including The MacDowell Colony (6 times) and Yaddo.

Carol March, Bloom

Promised by Carol March

Promised by Carol March

Spring blooming is a sudden, violent affair. Things push out and grow with great speed. They crowd and form tangled, beautiful environments. Carol March is drawn to the great variety of shapes, patterns and colors of botanical subject matter, to the way plants always seem to gesture and dance.

To share her life-long love of plants, March’s approach is constructive. She takes many photographs and combines elements of them into bloom tableaus. Her working method is derived from painting, which used to be her primary artistic medium.

Bio: Carol March, of Willow NY is a photographer and painter who has exhibited widely in New York City, The Hudson Valley and Northeast region. For almost 30 years, March worked as a graphic designer at New York, Time and Fortune Magazines. She also taught color theory at Parsons School of Design.

March is a recipient of a NYFA grant in painting. After several residencies at the Byrdcliffe Art Colony in Woodstock, she joined the Exhibition Committee of the Kleinert/James Gallery and has curated eight shows. She earned a BFA from Cornell University and an MFA from the School of Visual Arts, NYC.

Selected through our Portfolio Showcase Call for Work,
the gallery is also featuring
portfolios by Linda Hamilton Laux & Michael Bogdanffy Kriegh

Emily Hamilton Laux, Invasives: Beauty vs Beauty

Appleblossom Bittersweet

Invasives is Emily Hamilton Laux’s entry-point into today’s conversation about biodiversity. Here she addresses questions about the earth’s changing ecosystems. The project represents her personal exploration of the plants that grow in our backyards, along the edges of fields and parking lots, as well flora that are cultivated for their beauty. All of these plants have complex roles and relationships in the ecosystems where they grow. In Invasives: Beauty Versus Beauty (part 1), selected plant species are portrayed in isolation or with one or two other species.

Laux invites the viewer to question his/her own concepts of beauty and function in the landscape, and explore ideas about biodiversity through her observation of native, invasive, naturalized and cultivated species of plants. “The conversation is enormous, exciting, and changing rapidly.”

Bio:  Visual artist Emily Hamilton Laux’s primary medium is photography. A member of the Westport Artists’ Collective and Ridgefield Guild of Artists, she opened her own studio at Firing Circuits in 2016. Laux has exhibited in a group in Connecticut including Ridgefield Guild of Artists Camera Works, ArtWorks, Westport Artists’ Collective Group Show and at Simon Pearce, Westport in a solo exhibit.  Previously, Laux worked as a writer, editor, and photojournalist; she also worked as a gallery manager and publicist in the visual arts.

Born in Saigon, and raised in Cambodia, Paris and Washington, D.C., Laux has an MA in International Economics from American University and she earned her BA at Tulane University in New Orleans, where maintains close ties.  Laux believes her art work is informed by her cultural experiences in Asia and the Deep South.

Michael Bogdanffy-Kriegh, Meditations: Flora

20150503-042 Beacon NY

20150503-042 Beacon NY

Charles Ives’ Unanswered Question is an organizational metaphor for Michael Bogdannfy-Kriegh’s work. The music has three parts; a continuous hum or “music of the spheres;” a poser of the question; a chorus trying, unsuccessfully, to answer the question. His photographic practice is a meditative dipping into the hum, a stream of observations. From this stream he makes images and assemblages, which are not definitive questions or answerers, just meditations on the hum.

Bio:  Michael Bogdanffy-Kriegh’s work has been shaped through a daily meditative walk and writing practice during which he photographs whatever compels him. His work has appeared in several exhibitions, including Welcome: Page by Page, an exhibit of artist books curated by Hannah Frieser at the Center for Photography in Woodstock, and the 21st Annual Juried Show: Peter Urban Legacy Exhibition, juried by Jim Casper, at the Griffin Museum of Photography, Winchester MA. His photographs have been published in Shots Magazine issue #129 and issue #130, the annual portfolio edition. He is a self trained photographer living and working in Beacon, NY. Formally trained as an architect, he made the decision to focus exclusively on his photography work in 2013. 

George Pollack, Birch Tree Lamps

Birch Tree Lamp by George Pollack

Birch Tree Lamp by George Pollack

George Pollock has been a carpenter, builder and cabinetmaker for 45 years. He has worked in Philadelphia, Pa., Key West, Fl., and Woodstock, NY. Twenty years ago, he started camping in the Adirondacks and fell in love with the rustic furniture of the area. Pollock responded to this by creating furniture from natural materials. He now constructs tables, lamps, and various functional objects out of found wood, bark, grape vines, concrete and Oriental Bittersweet.